franšais

So much to read, and so little time...

You can very well be a computer geek and like reading "traditional" books (as opposed to electronic books, that should flood the stores anytime soon, or so they say). Of course, I have particular tastes (who said "typical"?), and I cannot say whether my tastes made me turn towards certain books, or whether reading these books shaped my tastes...

When I was younger, I read a great number of novels by Jules Verne. I do not think this is sub-literature, I rather think it is some form of literature that might be quite suited for a teenager who is fond of science. It is difficult to define the Jules Verne genre. Sometimes, it is pure science fiction, always with a reliable scientific basis; and the visionary aspect of this part of his works can now be really appreciated. Sometimes, his novels were of the adventure kind, and took the reader on a journey through the world in the nineteenth century.

The genres I have been interested in later are a little bit clearer: "medieval fantasy" with "The Hobbit" and "The Lord Of The Rings" by J.R.R. Tolkien, Tom Clancy's political thrillers (particularly the Jack Ryan series), and science fiction by Isaac Asimov, whose novels can be considered as milestones for modern science fiction.

There is another author whom I find particularly interesting, because of the spiritual (that is, metaphysical, philosophical or religious) aspect of his works, and whom I cannot yet fully understand. This author is Richard Bach. "Jonathan Livingston Seagull" is his best-known work, I have also read "One" and "The Messiah". I should readd them again, I want to take my thinking a little further. In addition, he is a pilot, and he always refers to flying and flight in his books. A little bit like Antoinde de Saint-Exupéry, whose works I should read or re-read. I have only read "Le petit prince" and "Vol de nuit" so far, it is not much but it gave me the urge to read more.

There will be more later...

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